Tag: Archer Alexander

Washington Metropolitan AME Zion

When Archer Alexander passed away in December of 1880, his funeral would be held at his church, on Morgan Street in St. Louis. Washington Metropolitan AME Zion had begun in St. Louis on the eve of the Emancipation Proclamation in 1865, and would become the first AME Zion church west of the Mississippi.

Archer Alexander Day Events

On September 24, 2022, residents of St. Charles County, the City of St. Charles, and the City of St. Louis would commemorate the emancipation of Archer Alexander…

September 24, 1863

Archer was emancipated for “his important services to the U.S. Military forces.” He was freed by the Order of Brig. Gen. Strong, which was announced on September 24, 1863.

The Untold Story

Isn’t it time we tell the whole story? There is so much more to this man’s life than we knew. Recent research has uncovered so much more…

7 September 1829 – Twelfth Entry

7 September 1829…crossed the river in the horse boat. Our party now consists of fifty five persons, 20 horses, 10 dogs and 4 cows. One of our carriage horses had become very lame in Charleston and we had to leave it with Mr. Calhoun…

5 September 1829 – Eleventh Entry

As the journey continues, Archer Alexander is with William Campbell, who shares today’s daily entry in his journal of 1829…

25 August 1829 – Sixth entry

We entered on a very mountainous region crossed Meadow Mountain, Big and Little Sewell and numerous other ridges, for which the inhabitants say thay cannot afford names.

24 August 1829 – Fifth entry

Staid in Lewisburg until evening. It was a quarterly court and a day of great resort in Lewisburg. Started in the evening and came to Pierce’s [Pierie’s] ten miles over the Muddy Creek Mountain. Fared well….

23 August 1829 – Fourth entry

Came to Callahan’s for breakfast. A fine Tavern stand. Finely kept by the owner who is much a gentleman. We now commenced traveling on the turnpike. The road is very excellent considering the mountainous regions through which it passes – crosses the Alleghany. Passed the White Sulpher Springs where there were two hundred visitors. Written in 1829, this is the journal of William M. Campbell. This is also the story of Archer Alexander, an enslaved man born in Lexington, Virginia, who was taken to Missouri in 1829 and who is with President Lincoln on the Emancipation Monument in Washington, D.C. today.

22 August 1829 – Third entry

Made an early start, crossed the Warm Spring Mountain, lately improved by turn piking. Passed the Warm Springs where there were forty visitors and Hot Springs, where there were sixty. Were detained on the road by the oversetting and breaking of a South Carolina Sulky. We met in a narow place and he capsized and we had to help him refit before he could proceed…

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